The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877

Yale Course , Spring 2008 , Prof. David Blight

121 students enrolled

Overview

Introductions: Why Does the Civil War Era Have a Hold on American Historical - Southern Society: Slavery, King Cotton, and Antebellum America's - A Southern World View: The Old South and Proslavery Ideology - A Northern World View: Yankee Society, Antislavery Ideology and the Abolition Movement - Telling a Free Story: Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in Myth and Reality - Expansion and Slavery: Legacies of the Mexican War and the Compromise of 1850 - "A Hell of a Storm": The Kansas-Nebraska Act and the Birth of the Republican Party, 1854-55 - Dred Scott, Bleeding Kansas, and the Impending Crisis of the Union, 1855-58 - John Brown's Holy War: Terrorist or Heroic Revolutionary? - The Election of 1860 and the Secession Crisis - Slavery and State Rights, Economies and Ways of Life: What Caused the Civil War? - "And the War Came," 1861: The Sumter Crisis, Comparative Strategies - Terrible Swift Sword: The Period of Confederate Ascendency, 1861-1862 - Never Call Retreat: Military and Political Turning Points in 1863 - Lincoln, Leadership, and Race: Emancipation as Policy - Days of Jubilee: The Meanings of Emancipation and Total War - Homefronts and Battlefronts: - "War So Terrible": Why the Union Won and the Confederacy Lost at Home and Abroad - To Appomattox and Beyond: The End of the War and a Search for Meanings - Wartime Reconstruction: Imagining the Aftermath and a Second American Republic - Andrew Johnson and the Radicals: A Contest over the Meaning of Reconstruction - Constitutional Crisis and Impeachment of a President - Black Reconstruction in the South: The Freedpeople and the Economics of Land and Labor - Retreat from Reconstruction: The Grant Era and Paths to The "End" of Reconstruction: Disputed Election of 1876, and the "Compromise of 1877" - Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory - Legacies of the Civil War

Lecture 14: Never Call Retreat Military and Political Turning Points in 1863

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        Lecture Details

        The Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST 119) Professor Blight lectures on the military history of the early part of the war. Beginning with events in the West, Blight describes the Union victories at Fort Donelson and Fort Henry, introduces Union General Ulysses S. Grant, and narrates the horrific battle of Shiloh, fought in April of 1862. Moving back East, the lecture describes the Union General George McClellans abortive 1862 Peninsula campaign, which introduced the world to Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. The lecture concludes with Confederate General Robert E. Lees decision to take the battle to the North. 0000 - Chapter 1. The Mood of the Civil War and McClellans Army 0946 - Chapter 2. Early Union Successes and Ulysses S. Grants Entry into the War 2007 - Chapter 3. The Battle of Shiloh 2629 - Chapter 4. McClellans Abortive 1862 Naval Campaign and "Stonewall" Jackson 3334 - Chapter 5. The Battle of Seven Days and Robert E. Lees Move North 4914 - Chapter 6. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

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