Roman Architecture

Yale Course , Spring 2009 , Prof. Diana E. E. Kleiner

125 students enrolled

Overview

Introduction to Roman Architecture - It Takes a City: The Founding of Rome and the Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy - Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture - Civic Life Interrupted: Nightmare and Destiny on August 24, A.D. 79 - Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Houses and Villas at Pompeii - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration - Gilding the Lily: Painting Palaces and Villas in the First Century A.D - Exploring Special Subjects on Pompeian Walls - From Brick to Marble: Augustus Assembles Rome - Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves - Notorious Nero and His Amazing Architectural Legacy - The Creation of an Icon: The Colosseum and Contemporary Architecture in Rome - The Prince and the Palace: Human Made Divine on the Palatine Hill - Paper Topics: Discovering the Roman Provinces and Designing a Roman City - The Mother of All Forums: Civic Architecture in Rome under Trajan - Rome and a Villa: Hadrian's Pantheon and Tivoli Retreat - The Roman Way of Life and Death at Ostia, the Port of Rome - Bigger Is Better: The Baths of Caracalla and Other Second- and Third-Century Buildings in Rome - Hometown Boy: Honoring an Emperor's Roots in Roman North Africa - Baroque Extravaganzas: Rock Tombs, Fountains, and Sanctuaries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Libya - Roman Wine in Greek Bottles: The Rebirth of Athens - Making Mini Romes on the Western Frontier - Rome Redux: The Tetrarchic Renaissance - Rome of Constantine and a New Rome

Lecture 10: Accessing Afterlife Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves

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        Lecture Details

        Roman Architecture (HSAR 252) Professor Kleiner explores sepulchral architecture in Rome commissioned by the emperor, aristocrats, successful professionals, and former slaves during the age of Augustus. Unlike most civic and residential buildings, tombs serve no practical purpose other than to commemorate the deceased and consequently assume a wide variety of personalized and remarkable forms. The lecture begins with the round Mausoleum of Augustus, based on Etruscan precedents and intended to house the remains of Augustus and the new Julio-Claudian dynasty. Professor Kleiner also highlights two of Romes most unusual funerary structures the pyramidal Tomb of Gaius Cestius, an aristocrat related to Marcus Agrippa, and the trapezoidal Tomb of Marcus Vergilius Eurysaces, probably a former slave who made his fortune overseeing the baking and public distribution of bread for the Roman army. Professor Kleiner concludes the lecture with a brief discussion of tombs for those with more modest means, including extensive subterranean columbaria. She also turns briefly to the domed thermal baths at Baia, part of an ancient spa and a sign of where concrete construction would take the future of Roman architecture. 0000 - Chapter 1. Augustus Family Mausoleum 1104 - Chapter 2. Etruscan Antecedents of the Mausoleum of Augustus 1913 - Chapter 3. The Tomb of Caecilia Metella on the Via Appia 2855 - Chapter 4. The Pyramidal Tomb of Gaius Cestius 4133 - Chapter 5. The Tomb of the Baker Eurysaces and His Wife Atistia 5030 - Chapter 6. Atistias Breadbasket and Eurysaces Achievements 010016 - Chapter 7. Tombs for Those of Modest Means and the Future of Concrete Architecture Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

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