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Roman Architecture

Yale,, Spring 2009 , Prof. Diana E. E. Kleiner

Updated On 02 Feb, 19

Overview

Introduction to Roman Architecture - It Takes a City: The Founding of Rome and the Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy - Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture - Civic Life Interrupted: Nightmare and Destiny on August 24, A.D. 79 - Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Houses and Villas at Pompeii - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration - Gilding the Lily: Painting Palaces and Villas in the First Century A.D - Exploring Special Subjects on Pompeian Walls - From Brick to Marble: Augustus Assembles Rome - Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves - Notorious Nero and His Amazing Architectural Legacy - The Creation of an Icon: The Colosseum and Contemporary Architecture in Rome - The Prince and the Palace: Human Made Divine on the Palatine Hill - Paper Topics: Discovering the Roman Provinces and Designing a Roman City - The Mother of All Forums: Civic Architecture in Rome under Trajan - Rome and a Villa: Hadrian's Pantheon and Tivoli Retreat - The Roman Way of Life and Death at Ostia, the Port of Rome - Bigger Is Better: The Baths of Caracalla and Other Second- and Third-Century Buildings in Rome - Hometown Boy: Honoring an Emperor's Roots in Roman North Africa - Baroque Extravaganzas: Rock Tombs, Fountains, and Sanctuaries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Libya - Roman Wine in Greek Bottles: The Rebirth of Athens - Making Mini Romes on the Western Frontier - Rome Redux: The Tetrarchic Renaissance - Rome of Constantine and a New Rome

Includes

Lecture 15: The Mother of All Forums Civic Architecture in Rome under Trajan

4.1 ( 11 )


Lecture Details

Roman Architecture (HSAR 252)

Professor Kleiner analyzes the major public architectural commissions of the emperor Trajan in Rome. Distinguished by their remarkably ambitious scale, these buildings mimic Trajans expansion of the Roman Empire to its furthest reaches. Professor Kleiner begins with Trajans restoration of the Forum of Julius Caesar and proceeds to the Baths of Trajan. Situated on the Oppian and Esquiline Hills, these Trajanic baths follow the basic model of the earlier imperial Baths of Titus but increase the size of the complex several times. Most of the lecture focuses on the famous Forum and Markets of Trajan, built on land that the engineer and architect Apollodorus of Damascus created by cutting away part of the Quirinal Hill. The Forum of Trajan consists of a large open rectangular area, a basilica, Greek and Latin libraries, and a temple dedicated to Trajan after his death. Between the libraries stands the celebrated Column of Trajan with a spiral frieze commemorating the emperors military victories in Dacia (modern Romania) and reaching a height of 125 feet. The brick-faced concrete Markets of Trajan climb up the hill and form a dramatic contrast to the marble forum. The lecture concludes with a brief discussion of the Arch of Trajan at Benevento, which depicts scenes of the emperors greatest accomplishments and the first representations of his successor, Hadrian.

0000 - Chapter 1. Trajan Expands the Empire and Initiates Public Architecture in Rome
0754 - Chapter 2. The Baths of Trajan
2210 - Chapter 3. The Forum of Trajan
3130 - Chapter 4. The Basilica Ulpia
4536 - Chapter 5. The Column of Trajan
5930 - Chapter 6. The Markets of Trajan and The Succession of Hadrian

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Ratings

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Comments
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Sam

Excellent course helped me understand topic that i couldn't while attendinfg my college.

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Dembe

Great course. Thank you very much.

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