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Roman Architecture

Yale,, Spring 2009 , Prof. Diana E. E. Kleiner

Updated On 02 Feb, 19

Overview

Introduction to Roman Architecture - It Takes a City: The Founding of Rome and the Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy - Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture - Civic Life Interrupted: Nightmare and Destiny on August 24, A.D. 79 - Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Houses and Villas at Pompeii - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration - Gilding the Lily: Painting Palaces and Villas in the First Century A.D - Exploring Special Subjects on Pompeian Walls - From Brick to Marble: Augustus Assembles Rome - Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves - Notorious Nero and His Amazing Architectural Legacy - The Creation of an Icon: The Colosseum and Contemporary Architecture in Rome - The Prince and the Palace: Human Made Divine on the Palatine Hill - Paper Topics: Discovering the Roman Provinces and Designing a Roman City - The Mother of All Forums: Civic Architecture in Rome under Trajan - Rome and a Villa: Hadrian's Pantheon and Tivoli Retreat - The Roman Way of Life and Death at Ostia, the Port of Rome - Bigger Is Better: The Baths of Caracalla and Other Second- and Third-Century Buildings in Rome - Hometown Boy: Honoring an Emperor's Roots in Roman North Africa - Baroque Extravaganzas: Rock Tombs, Fountains, and Sanctuaries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Libya - Roman Wine in Greek Bottles: The Rebirth of Athens - Making Mini Romes on the Western Frontier - Rome Redux: The Tetrarchic Renaissance - Rome of Constantine and a New Rome

Includes

Lecture 2: It Takes a City The Founding of Rome and the Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy

4.1 ( 11 )


Lecture Details

Roman Architecture (HSAR 252)

Professor Kleiner traces the evolution of Roman architecture from its beginnings in the eight-century B.C. Iron Age through the late Republican period. The lecture features traditional Roman temple architecture as a synthesis of Etruscan and Greek temple types, early defensive wall building in Rome and environs, and a range of technologies and building practices that made this architecture possible. City planning in such early Roman colonies as Cosa and Ostia is also discussed, as are examples of the first uses of the arch and of concrete construction, two elements that came to dominate Roman architectural practice. The lecture ends with an analysis of typical late Republican temples at Rome, Cori, and Tivoli.

0000 - Chapter 1. Romulus Founds Rome
1005 - Chapter 2. Defensive Stone Walls and Regular Town Planning
2737 - Chapter 3. Early Republican Architecture
4506 - Chapter 4. The Hellenization of Late Republican Temple Architecture
010320 - Chapter 5. The Advent of the Corinthian Order

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Ratings

4.5


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Comments
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Sam

Excellent course helped me understand topic that i couldn't while attendinfg my college.

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Dembe

Great course. Thank you very much.

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