Econ Dept Seminars

University of Canterbury Course , Winter 2009 , Prof. John Fountain

175 students enrolled

Overview

Seminars and public lectures presented in the Economics Department,School of Business and Eonomics.

Lecture 13: Ancient Inequality (Jeffrey Williamson) I

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        Lecture Details

        Prof Jeffrey Williamson from Harvard (click here for Jeffreys home page) presented an interesting and lively seminar on the measurement and dynamics of inequality. Has inequality changed much through the centuries? Were pre-industrial societies more unequal in ancient times than pre-industrial societies today? Was inequality been increased by colonization? All interesting questions...but how does one answer them? Well, Prof Williamsons seminar does just that, in an interesting and fascinating blend of economic theory (of inequality measurement) with the tools of the diligent modern economic historian. This is a GREAT seminar for anyone interested in economic history...and if youre interests dont lie in that direction, watch listen to this seminar because itll get you interested if you have any intellectual curiosity at all!!Original mp4s of this video and other resources related to the presentationseminar (eg pdf of the paper) can be obtained at httpuctv.canterbury.ac.nzmodulesjournaljournal.php?space_key=1&module_key=70

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