Early Modern England

Yale Course , Prof. Keith E. Wrightson

122 students enrolled

Overview

General Introduction - The Tree of Commonwealth : The Social Order in the Sixteenth Century - Households: Structures, Priorities, Strategies, Roles - Communities: Key Institutions and Relationships - Countries and Nation: Social and Economic Networks and the Urban System - The Structures of Power - Late Medieval Religion and Its Critics - Reformation and Division, 1530-1558 - "Commodity" and "Commonwealth": Economic and Social Problems, 1520-1560 - The Elizabethan Confessional State: Conformity, Papists and Puritans - The Elizabethan - Economic Expansion, 1560-1640 - A Polarizing Society, 1560-1640 - Witchcraft and Magic - Crime and the Law - Popular Protest - Education and Literacy - Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians - Crown and Political Nation, 1604-1640 - Constitutional Revolution and Civil War, 1640-1646 - Regicide and Republic, 1647-1660 - An Unsettled Settlement: The Restoration Era, 1660-1688 - England, Britain, and the World: Economic Development, 1660-1720 - Refashioning the State, 1688-1714 - Concluding Discussion and Advice on Examination

Lecture 16: Popular Protest

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        Lecture Details

        Early Modern England Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson reviews the basic structures and aims of popular protest notably food riots and agrarian disturbances. He notes that such disturbances were often surprisingly orderly affairs, rather than chaotic expressions of discontent. They aimed to defend traditional rights (rooted in custom) that participants felt were being threatened, either by food shortages or by agrarian changes such as enclosure. The forms taken by such events reveal a coherent moral order. Professor Wrightson reviews the tactics employed by protestors and the ways in which they constituted attempts to negotiate with authority. Official responses were often equally restrained (although the government was capable in some situations of displaying real severity). He concludes by noting that these forms of early modern popular protest were fundamentally political in nature, and that while agrarian resistance gradually subsided, these defenses of popular custom and rights influenced early forms of labor organization from the late seventeenth century onwards. 0000 - Chapter 1. Riot 1821 - Chapter 2. Ritualism 2138 - Chapter 3. Legitimizing Ideas 2901 - Chapter 4. Riot as a Tactic 3750 - Chapter 5. Riot as Un-political Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

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