Early Modern England

Yale Course , Prof. Keith E. Wrightson

113 students enrolled

Overview

General Introduction - The Tree of Commonwealth : The Social Order in the Sixteenth Century - Households: Structures, Priorities, Strategies, Roles - Communities: Key Institutions and Relationships - Countries and Nation: Social and Economic Networks and the Urban System - The Structures of Power - Late Medieval Religion and Its Critics - Reformation and Division, 1530-1558 - "Commodity" and "Commonwealth": Economic and Social Problems, 1520-1560 - The Elizabethan Confessional State: Conformity, Papists and Puritans - The Elizabethan - Economic Expansion, 1560-1640 - A Polarizing Society, 1560-1640 - Witchcraft and Magic - Crime and the Law - Popular Protest - Education and Literacy - Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians - Crown and Political Nation, 1604-1640 - Constitutional Revolution and Civil War, 1640-1646 - Regicide and Republic, 1647-1660 - An Unsettled Settlement: The Restoration Era, 1660-1688 - England, Britain, and the World: Economic Development, 1660-1720 - Refashioning the State, 1688-1714 - Concluding Discussion and Advice on Examination

Lecture 2: The Tree of Commonwealth The Social Order in the Sixteenth Century

Up Next
You can skip ad in
SKIP AD >
Advertisement
      • 2x
      • 1.5x
      • 1x
      • 0.5x
      • 0.25x
        EMBED LINK
        COPY
        DIRECT LINK
        PRIVATE CONTENT
        OK
        Enter password to view
        Please enter valid password!
        0:00
        3.0 (2 Ratings)

        Lecture Details

        Early Modern England Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson provides a broad sketch of the social order of early modern England, focusing on the hierarchical language of "estates" and "degrees" and the more communitarian ideal of the "commonwealth" by which society was organized. The differences between the social structure in rural and urban areas are addressed and the subordinate roles of women and the young are also outlined. Professor Wrightson discusses the differences between members of peerage, the gentry, and the commonalty and the social positions of servants, yeoman, husbandmen, and apprentices are explained. The mechanisms by which the social order was preserved, such as prescriptive literature and ecclesiastical injunctions, are also considered. Professor Wrightson concludes that, while in the theory the social order was rigidly hierarchical and rooted in relationships of authority and subordination, in practice there was a great more flexibility and ambiguity within every day interpersonal social relationships. 0000 - Chapter 1. The Tree of Commonwealth 1107 - Chapter 2. The Nobility 1817 - Chapter 3. The Commonalty 2626 - Chapter 4. Gender and Age Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

        LECTURES



        Review


        3.0

        2 Rates
        5
        50%
        1
        1
        50%
        1

        Comments Added Successfully!
        Please Enter Comments
        Please Enter CAPTCHA
        Invalid CAPTCHA
        Please Login and Submit Your Comment