Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner

Yale Course , Prof. Wai Chee Dimock

113 students enrolled

Overview

Introduction - Hemingway's In Our Time - Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury - Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not - Fitzgerald - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell Tolls - Fitzgerald - Tender Is the Night - Faulkner, Light in August

Lecture 11: Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not

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        Lecture Details

        Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246)Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of To Have and Have Not by showing how, in the context of the Cuban Revolutions and the Great Depression, characters devolve into those who "Have" and those who "Have Not." While protagonist Harry Morgan may look like a political and economic "Have Not" -- he neither supports the revolution nor possesses enough money to extract himself from its seedier operations -- his ability to bring happiness to his wife Marie makes him a social "Have" in a more profound sense. Dimock casts Harry as a "mediated Have," someone who, through the eyes of others, might be said to be in possession of something vital, denied to others with material and political satisfactions. Warning This lecture contains graphic content andor adult language that some viewers may find disturbing0000 - Chapter 1. The Film Version of To Have and Have Not 0305 - Chapter 2. Criticism of To Have and Have Not0918 - Chapter 3. Macro History of Cuba in 19301523 - Chapter 4. Harry as a Political "Have Not"1905 - Chapter 5. The Great Depression in To Have and Have Not 2257 - Chapter 6. Harry as an Economic "Have Not"2424 - Chapter 7. Harrys Loss of Choice as a "Have Not"2652 - Chapter 8. Harry as an Ironic "Have" 3212 - Chapter 9. Harry as a Mediated "Have" Through the Eyes of Marie3657 - Chapter 10. Harry as a Mediated "Have" Through the Eyes of Richard Gordon4448 - Chapter 11. Hemingway and Joyces Female SoliloquiesComplete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpoyc.yale.eduThis course was recorded in Fall 2011.

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