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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000

Yale, , Prof. Paul Freedman

Updated On 02 Feb, 19

Overview

Course Introduction: Rome's Greatness and First Crises - The Crisis of the Third Century and the Diocletianic Reforms - Constantine and the Early Church -The Christian Roman Empire - St. Augustine's Confessions - Transformation of the Roman Empire - Barbarian Kingdoms - survival in the East - The Reign of Justinian - Clovis and the Franks - Frankish Society - Britain and Ireland-Monasticism - Mohammed and the Arab Conquests - Islamic Conquests and Civil War - The Early Middle Ages, 284 -1000: The Splendor of the Abbasid Period - The Crucial - Seventh Century - The Splendor of Byzantium - Charlemagne - Intellectuals and the Court of Charlemagne - Crisis of the Carolingians

Includes

Lecture 22: Vikings The European Prospect, 1000

4.1 ( 11 )


Lecture Details

The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210)In the first part of this lecture, Professor Freedman discusses the emergence of the Vikings from Scandinavia in the ninth and tenth centuries. The Vikings were highly adaptive, raiding (the Carolingian Empire), trading (Byzantium and the Caliphate) or settling (Greenland and Iceland) depending on local conditions. Through their wide-ranging travels, the Vikings created networks bringing into contact parts of the world that were previously either not connected or minimally so. Professor Freedman concludes the lecture, and the course, by considering whats been accomplished between 284 and 1000. Although Europe in the year 1000 experienced many of the same problems as did the Roman Empire 284 where we began -- population decline and lack of urbanization, among others -- the end of the early Middle Ages also arguable heralds the emergence of Europe and Christendom as cultural constructs and sets the stage for the rise of the West. 0000 - Chapter 1. Introduction 1352 - Chapter 2. The Vikings in England and on the Continent2105 - Chapter 3. The Vikings in the East2920 - Chapter 4. The Vikings in the West3709 - Chapter 5. Conclusion Whats been accomplished?Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpoyc.yale.eduThis course was recorded in Fall 2011.

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Comments
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Sam

Excellent course helped me understand topic that i couldn't while attendinfg my college.

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Dembe

Great course. Thank you very much.

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