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Introduction to the Old Testament

Yale, , Prof. Christine Hayes

Updated On 02 Feb, 19

Overview

The Parts of the Whole - The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Biblical Religion in Context - Genesis 1-4 in Context-Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources - Critical Approaches to the Bible: Introduction to Genesis 12-50 - Biblical Narrative: The Stories of the Patriarchs (Genesis 12-36)-Israel in Egypt: Moses and the Beginning of Yahwism (Genesis 37- Exodus 4) - Exodus: From Egypt to Sinai (Exodus 5-24, 32; Numbers) -The Priestly Legacy: Cult and Sacrifice, Purity and Holiness in Leviticus and Numbers

Biblical Law: The Three Legal Corpora of JE (Exodus), P (Leviticus and Numbers) and D-On the Steps of Moab: Deuteronomy - The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land - Response to Catastrophe -Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets - Literary Prophecy: Amos - Hosea and Isaiah- Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk - Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah) - Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature - Biblical Poetry: Psalms and Song of Songs - The Restoration: 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah - Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature - Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah

Includes

Lecture 23: Visions of the End Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

4.1 ( 11 )


Lecture Details

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).0000 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth 1158 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books 2305 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature 2911 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books 3521 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6 4236 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12 Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpoyc.yale.eduThis course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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Comments
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Sam

Excellent course helped me understand topic that i couldn't while attendinfg my college.

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Dembe

Great course. Thank you very much.

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