Neuroscience

Columbia University Course , Prof. Jerome L. Greene

62 students enrolled

Overview

Jerome L. Greene Science Center Will Be Interdisciplinary Hub - What Songbirds Can Teach Us About the Brain - A Conversation With Eric Kandel - Announcement of the New Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute - A Major Cause of Age Related Memory Loss Identified - Study Advances New Theory of How the Brain Is Wired - Thomas M. Jessell Discusses MBBI and the Greene Science Center - Faculty Forum on Interdisciplinary Neuroscience - Imaging the Living Brain

Lecture 6: Study Advances New Theory of How the Brain Is Wired

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        Lecture Details

        Speaking. Seeing. Hearing. Thinking. Remembering. Understanding this sentence and making a decision about whether or not to read on. All of this work is handled in the cerebral cortex, the deeply creased, outermost portion of the brain that is the center of all the higher brain functions that make us human. Humans have the thickest cortex of any species but, even so, it measures no more than 4 millimeters (.16 inches) thick. For decades, scientists thought they had a pretty clear understanding of how signals move through the cerebral cortex. By studying the anatomy of nerve axons—the wires that connect nerve cells—they had concluded that information is relayed through a "column" of six layers of specialized nerve cells in a series of hand-offs that begins in the mid-layer of the cortex, then moves to other layers before triggering a behavioral response. Dr. Randy Bruno. Photo by Amelia Panico. Now a study by Columbia neuroscientist Dr. Randy Bruno indicates this longstanding view is incorrect. Looking at how sensory information is processed in rats, Bruno found that signals are processed in two parts of the cortex simultaneously rather than in series—almost as if there are two brains. Morenews.columbia.eduresearch3191

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