Roman Architecture

Yale Course , Spring 2009 , Prof. Diana E. E. Kleiner

125 students enrolled

Overview

Introduction to Roman Architecture - It Takes a City: The Founding of Rome and the Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy - Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture - Civic Life Interrupted: Nightmare and Destiny on August 24, A.D. 79 - Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Houses and Villas at Pompeii - Habitats at Herculaneum and Early Roman Interior Decoration - Gilding the Lily: Painting Palaces and Villas in the First Century A.D - Exploring Special Subjects on Pompeian Walls - From Brick to Marble: Augustus Assembles Rome - Accessing Afterlife: Tombs of Roman Aristocrats, Freedmen, and Slaves - Notorious Nero and His Amazing Architectural Legacy - The Creation of an Icon: The Colosseum and Contemporary Architecture in Rome - The Prince and the Palace: Human Made Divine on the Palatine Hill - Paper Topics: Discovering the Roman Provinces and Designing a Roman City - The Mother of All Forums: Civic Architecture in Rome under Trajan - Rome and a Villa: Hadrian's Pantheon and Tivoli Retreat - The Roman Way of Life and Death at Ostia, the Port of Rome - Bigger Is Better: The Baths of Caracalla and Other Second- and Third-Century Buildings in Rome - Hometown Boy: Honoring an Emperor's Roots in Roman North Africa - Baroque Extravaganzas: Rock Tombs, Fountains, and Sanctuaries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Libya - Roman Wine in Greek Bottles: The Rebirth of Athens - Making Mini Romes on the Western Frontier - Rome Redux: The Tetrarchic Renaissance - Rome of Constantine and a New Rome

Lecture 23: Rome Redux The Tetrarchic Renaissance

Up Next
You can skip ad in
SKIP AD >
Advertisement
      • 2x
      • 1.5x
      • 1x
      • 0.5x
      • 0.25x
        EMBED LINK
        COPY
        DIRECT LINK
        PRIVATE CONTENT
        OK
        Enter password to view
        Please enter valid password!
        0:00
        5.0 (1 Ratings)

        Lecture Details

        Roman Architecture (HSAR 252) Professor Kleiner characterizes third-century Rome as an "architectural wasteland" due to the rapid change of emperors, continuous civil war, and a crumbling economy. There was no time to build and the only major architectural commission was a new defensive wall. The crisis came to an end with the rise of Diocletian, who created a new form of government called the Tetrarchy, or four-man rule, with two leaders in the East and two in the West. Diocletian and his colleagues instituted a major public and private building campaign in Rome and the provinces, which reflected the Empires renewed stability. Professor Kleiner begins with Diocletians commissions in Rome--a five-column monument dedicated to the tenth anniversary of the formation of the Tetrarchy, the restoration of the Curia or Senate House, and the monumental Baths of Diocletian. She then presents Diocletians Palace at Split, designed as a military camp and including the emperors octagonal mausoleum, followed by an overview of the palaces and villas of other tetrarchs in Greece and Sicily. Professor Kleiner concludes with the villa on the Via Appia in Rome belonging to Maxentius, son of a tetrarch, and the main rival of another tetrarchs son, Constantine the Great. 0000 - Chapter 1. Crisis in the Third Century and the Aurelian Walls 1147 - Chapter 2. The Rise of the Tetrarchy 1821 - Chapter 3. The Decennial or Five-Column Monument in the Roman Forum 2848 - Chapter 4. The Senate House or Curia Julia 3757 - Chapter 5. The Baths of Diocletian 4752 - Chapter 6. The Palace of Diocletian at Split 5730 - Chapter 7. Tetrarchic Palaces Around the Empire Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website httpopen.yale.educourses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

        LECTURES



        Review


        5.0

        1 Rates
        5
        100%
        1

        Comments Added Successfully!
        Please Enter Comments
        Please Enter CAPTCHA
        Invalid CAPTCHA
        Please Login and Submit Your Comment

        LECTURES